News

CopperSpice: Modern C++ and CsString

New videos on the CopperSpice YouTube Channel:

Modern C++, from the beginning to the middle (Part 1) (Part 2) (Part 3)

by Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim

About the videos:

A three part series on the fundamentals of modern C++, including move semantics, rvalues, and rvalue references.

CsString (Part 1) (Part 2)

by Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim

About the videos:

A two part series on CsString, our new standalone Unicode aware BSD licensed string library for C++.

Please take a look and remember to subscribe!

CppCast Episode 123: Grace Hopper Conference with Gina Stephens

Episode 123 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Gina Stephens to talk about the C++ Foundations presence at the Grace Hopper Conference, the St Louis C++ Meetup and a proposal for a new access specifier.

CppCast Episode 123: Grace Hopper Conference with Gina Stephens

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Gina Stephens is a software engineer with over 20 years' experience, 13 of those years leading development teams. Most of her experience has been with C++, in addition to Java, .NET and various scripting language. The breadth of her development experience includes DOD, FDA, DOI, Hospitality, and Finance.

Gina has a Bachelors in Computer Science from MS&T in Rolla, MO and a Masters in Computer Science from the University of Missouri – STL. She also founded and runs the STL C++ User Group.

Gina is also a Desert Storm Air Force veteran during which she worked on the B-52 bombers that were carpet-bombing Iraq. She is happily married with 2 sons, both of whom are serving in the US Navy.

C++ Day 2017 event in Italy (Italian only)

A full day of C++ in the Italian language:

C++ Day 2017

December 2, 2017

Modena.

The site and the event are entirely in Italian. Here is a translation of the main information:

In a nutshell

The C++ Day 2017 is a full-day event entirely dedicated to the C++ language, hosted in Modena (Italy), the heart of the so-called Motor Valley: a land displaying the best of the motor and racing world. Companies like Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini, Pagani, Ducati reside here.

The event consists in some technical sessions and networking.

Italian C++ professionals will speak (in Italian) on different C++ topics, including: Artificial Intelligence, UI, Interoperability and STL.

 

Who should attend the C++ Day 2017?

This event is made by C++ professionals for C++ professionals, students and enthusiasts. Whoever is interested in the C++ language and is keen on meeting the Italian C++ ecosystem is welcome!

 

What can I find in the C++ Day 2017?

The agenda consists of 5x60' tech talks and 2.5 hours allocated for networking. The event is also an opportunity to meet people working in the Motor Valley.

About the technical sessions, speakers will talk about:

  • (Slightly) Smarter Smart Pointers (Carlo Pescio)
  • C++ & UI: a different approach (Daniele Pallastrelli)
  • Immediate Mode Graphical User Interfaces in C++ (Stefano Cristiano)
  • C/C++ interoperability with other languages (Alberto Bignotti)
  • Artificial Intelligence, today (Sebastiano Galazzo)

Coffee breaks are included, lunch is not: people are encouraged to enjoy the lovely center of the city.

You can refer to the detailed program for more information.
 

When and Where will the C++ Day 2017 take place?

The event will be held on December 2, 2017 at Centro Culturale Alberione, in Modena (Italy). The location is in the center of the city, 10-minute walk from the main train station.

Check-in opens at 8.30 AM, the main event begins at 9.30 AM and will last for a full day.
 

Who supports this event?

Recognition Robotics and Sigeo are our sponsors.

O'Reilly supports the C++ Day with free books.

We are still open to sponsorships. Get in touch if you want to support/sponsor the event!

 

Do I need to register?

The C++ Day 2017 is free, but you must register to facilitate the organization of the event.

You can register here.

Overload 141 is now available—ACCU

ACCU’s Overload journal of October 2017 is out. It contains the following C++ related articles.

Overload 141

From the index:

'Speedy Gonzales' Serializing (Re)Actors via Allocators

Polymorphism in C++ - A Type Compatibility View

Open Source - And Still Deceiving Programmers

C++11 (and Beyond) Exception Support

ACCU 2018 Call for sessions—ACCU

The ACCU 2018 is now putting together its program, and they want you to speak on C++. The ACCU has a strong C++ track, though it is not a C++-only conference. If you have something to share, check out their

Call for Sessions

by the ACCU

From the article:

ACCU the conference is put on by ACCU the organisation, but is open to anyone who wishes to attend, not just members of the organisation. Obviously ACCU the organisation hopes that anyone not a member that attends ACCU the conference joins ACCU the organisation – and there is a stand at the conference for people to do exactly that.

So for content, ACCU the conference is looking for any material that is interesting to people who create software. Historically, ACCU has a lot of C++ and C content, and is proud of that: ACCU is the foremost annual conference for people interested in C++ and C, at least in and around the UK. But it is not just a C++ and C conference, ACCU is about programming in whatever language people are using, with whatever tools and processes people are using: D, Chapel, Java, Kotlin, C#, F#, Groovy, Rust, Go, Python, Ruby, Lisp, to name just a few programming languages about which there have been sessions at ACCU conferences.

See the 2017 schedule for examples.

The Call for Sessions lasts for about 5 weeks and will close on Friday 2017-11-17 T23:59+00:00.

C++17—Egor Bredikhin

A reminder of what C++17 bring:

C++17

by Egor Bredikhin

From the article:

C++ language is constantly evolving, and for us, as for developers of a static analyzer, it is important to track all its changes, in order to support all new features of the language. In this review article, I would like to share with the reader the most interesting innovations introduced in C++17, and demonstrate them with examples.

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

Episode 122 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Titus Winters from Google to talk about the Open Sourcing of Google's Abseil library.

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Titus Winters has spent the past 6 years working on Google's core C++ libraries. He's particularly interested in issues of large scale software engineer and codebase maintenance: how do we keep a codebase of over 100M lines of code consistent and flexible for the next decade? Along the way he has helped Google teams pioneer techniques to perform automated code transformations on a massive scale, and helps maintain the Google C++ Style Guide.

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released—John Montgomery

Good news from the Visual Studio blog:

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released

by John Montgomery

Notable C++ development highlights:

You can now use CMake for Linux C++ development in Visual Studio, which allows you to use CMake based projects that target Windows, Linux, or both. Simply open a folder with your CMake project, select Linux as your target and upon connecting to your Linux machine your sources are synchronized for you. Once the CMake cache generation is complete you’ll have full IntelliSense for your project and targets for building, running and debugging within Visual Studio. In addition to CMake support for Linux C++ development, with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4 Preview you can now benefit from CMake version 3.9 and improved support for projects with multiple CMakeLists.


Windows Application Packaging Project: In Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4, you will get the first peek at a new project template that enables Windows desktop apps created with .NET or C++ to be packaged inside an .appx package for easier distribution via side-loading or submission to the Microsoft Store. These templates work for both new Windows desktop projects, as well as for existing projects.