Product News

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released—John Montgomery

Good news from the Visual Studio blog:

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released

by John Montgomery

Notable C++ development highlights:

You can now use CMake for Linux C++ development in Visual Studio, which allows you to use CMake based projects that target Windows, Linux, or both. Simply open a folder with your CMake project, select Linux as your target and upon connecting to your Linux machine your sources are synchronized for you. Once the CMake cache generation is complete you’ll have full IntelliSense for your project and targets for building, running and debugging within Visual Studio. In addition to CMake support for Linux C++ development, with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4 Preview you can now benefit from CMake version 3.9 and improved support for projects with multiple CMakeLists.


Windows Application Packaging Project: In Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4, you will get the first peek at a new project template that enables Windows desktop apps created with .NET or C++ to be packaged inside an .appx package for easier distribution via side-loading or submission to the Microsoft Store. These templates work for both new Windows desktop projects, as well as for existing projects.

Introducing Abseil, a new common libraries project—Titus Winters

A new library is out!

Introducing Abseil, a new common libraries project

by Titus Winters

From the article:

Today we are open sourcing Abseil, a collection of libraries drawn from the most fundamental pieces of Google’s internal codebase. These libraries are the nuts-and-bolts that underpin almost everything that Google runs. Bits and pieces of these APIs are embedded in most of our open source projects, and now we have brought them together into one comprehensive project. Abseil encompasses the most basic building blocks of Google’s codebase: code that is production tested and will be fully maintained for years to come.

What’s new in clang-format 5

A good way to simplify your life:

What's new in clang-format 5

by Benoît Blanchon

From the article:

Clang 5 was released last week.
It's a good opportunity to talk about a not-enough-known tool: Clang-format.

Clang-format is part of the Clang project but can be used without the Clang compiler. It's an independent executable.

Clang-format is a code linter for C++. It takes a non-formatted code as input and produces a well-formatted code as output. The result is instantaneous.

Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 released with coroutines support—Anthony Williams

A new version is out.

Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 released with coroutines support

by Anthony Williams

From the article:

I am pleased to announce that Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 has been released. This adds support for gcc 7, clang 4.0 and clang 5.0, but the big change with this version is the support for coroutines with Microsoft Visual Studio 2017, and clang 5.0 on ubuntu when used with libc++ 5.0.

Two-phase name lookup support comes to MSVC—Andrew Pardoe

What two-phase name lookup entails, what’s currently implemented in MSVC, and how to make effective use of MSVC’s partial but substantial support for two-phase name lookup:

Two-phase name lookup support comes to MSVC

by Andrew Pardoe

From the article:

“Two-phase name lookup” is an informal term that refers to a set of rules governing the resolution of names used in a template declaration...

LLVM 5.0 Released

The 5th major version of the LLVM compiler infrastructure was released.

LLVM 5.0 Released

by the LLVM Team

About the release:

The Clang releated changes are documented on an extra page.

C++ coroutines are the major new feature. Beside that, C++17 feature implementation has been completed.

 

 

Visual Studio extensions for C++ developers in Visual Studio 2017—Adam Welch

Several Visual Studio extensions that can make your life better as a C++ developer:

Visual Studio extensions for C++ developers in Visual Studio 2017

by Adam Welch

From the article:

In this blogpost we want to highlight several Visual Studio extensions that can make your life better as a C++ developer if you’re using Visual Studio 2017 or considering upgrading...

Useful Improvements in the PVS-Studio 6.17 Release

In this version there are improvements, which, in my opinion, deserve a small note.

Useful Improvements in the PVS-Studio 6.17 Release

by Andrey Karpov

From the article:

A much more interesting feature is that a mechanism of virtual values was significantly redesigned in the kernel of C++ analyzer. For example, now the analyzer performs a double loop passage, which allows it to define the range of possible values of variables, changing in a loop, more accurately. So don't be surprised if the analyzer starts issuing many warnings for that code which used to seem correct for the analyzer.

Visual C++ for Linux Development with CMake—Marc Goodner

How to use Visual:

Visual C++ for Linux Development with CMake

by Marc Goodner

From the article:

In Visual Studio 2017 15.4 you can now target Linux from your CMake projects. This enables you to work on your existing code base that uses CMake as your build solution without having to convert it to a VS project. If your code base is cross-platform you can target both Windows and Linux from within Visual Studio.

This post will give an overview of the CMake support for Linux in Visual Studio. You can go here to learn more about CMake in Visual Studio generally.